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* Our homemade jams were produced in a home kitchen that is not subject to state licensure or inspection and that may also process common food allergens such as tree nuts, peanuts, eggs, soy, wheat, milk, fish, and crustacean shellfish.  These products are not intended for resale.  The homemade jams can also only be sold within Colorado.  Our shelf ready products are made for resale and can be sold throughout the world.

  • Bradley Brown

Making Sorbet with Your Jam

I'm often asked "what else can I use this jam for other than on my toast?" Jam is like food prep for a number of other things that you can make. In other words, using jam saves the vast majority of time required to make a number of dishes. If you look at a sorbet recipe it looks a LOT like a jam recipe, but with more water than jam has (jam doesn't have any water in it). I love using a spicy jam for my sorbet. For example, pineapple or blueberry serrano sorbet is out of this world good. If you prefer sweet and sour sorbet (i.e. without the heat), I highly recommend my lemon limoncello jam.


The only piece of equipment you need is an ice cream maker. I use the Kitchenaid attachment to make mine. You pull it out of the freezer and away you go with one batch of sorbet.


Making it is as simple as taking 1 part jam and adding 1 to 2 parts water (it all depends on how "icey" or rich you want the sorbet). I recommend 1 part water for your first batch of sorbet and go from there. Simply take 8 ounces of jam (that's 2 smalls or 1 medium or 1/2 a large of my jam sizes) and then add 8 ounces of water. I pour the jam into my attachment and let it work on the cooling the jam for a minute or so. The jam won't freeze, so then I start pouring in my cold water slowly. Too much water will lock it up or cause it to jerk as it sticks. The more water you add the icer and more frozen the sorbet will get. If you plan on putting it into the freezer and serving it after dinner (vs. making it and serving it immediately to impress your guest) you'll want to put less water in the jam (i.e. 1:1 ratio). The more water, the harder it freezes. The less water, the more slushy the mix. If you're going to make the sorbet for your guests at the end of your meal, I would premix the jam and water and have it in the fridge ready to go. You can tell them you slaved away all day making homemade sorbet for them. You'll simply drop it in the ice maker, and they will marvel at how amazing it is in a matter of minutes.


I look forward to hearing about your favorite sorbets that you make using jam (or anything else)!




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